Brasov to Ruse

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Sightseeings on trip​

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English speaking driver

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Hotel pick up / drop off

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Pet not allowed

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Up to 7 passengers

Your journey can be made with 4 types of cars: sedan for 1 – 3 people ( ex. Volkswagen Passat or Skoda Octavia),  executive (VIP) for 1-3 people (ex. Mercedes E Class or Audi A6), MPV for 1-4 people ( ex. Ford Galaxy or Volkswagen Touran) and VAN for  1-7 people ( ex. Renault Trafic or Volkswagen Transporter). If your group is bigger the 7 people we will use a combination of vehicles.  Also for every trip are available a few stops at interesting sightseeings for a price between 16 – 18 Euro/h.

Optional sights for visiting on this trip

Rasnov fortress

First mentioned in an official document in 1331, the fortress was built by Teutonic Knights as protection against invading Tartars and was later enlarged by the local Saxon population. Is located on a rocky hilltop in the Carpathian Mountains, 650 ft. above the town of Rasnov. Guarded by nine towers, two bastions and a drawbridge, the fortress was only breached once, in 1612,when the Ottomans discovered the secret passage inhabitants used to sneak out to fetch water. The fortress was last used as a place of refuge during the revolution of 1848 and was abandoned after that. Recently, the old fortress has been restored to its former glory and today, you can visit the impressive remains.

First mentioned in an official document in 1331, the fortress was built by Teutonic Knights as protection against invading Tartars and was later enlarged by the local Saxon population. Is located on a rocky hilltop in the Carpathian Mountains, 650 ft. above the town of Rasnov. Guarded by nine towers, two bastions and a drawbridge, the fortress was only breached once, in 1612,when the Ottomans discovered the secret passage inhabitants used to sneak out to fetch water. The fortress was last used as a place of refuge during the revolution of 1848 and was abandoned after that. Recently, the old fortress has been restored to its former glory and today, you can visit the impressive remains.

Bran Castle

Bran Castle also known as Dracula’ Castle is situated on the Transylvanian side of the historical border with Wallachia. ‘Dracula’s Castle’ was actually founded by the Teutonic Knights in 1212, and rebuilt by the Saxons of Kronstadt in 1377. Surrounded by an aura of mystery and legend and perched high atop a 200-foot-high rock, Bran Castle owes its fame to its imposing towers and turrets as well as to the myth created around Bram Stocker’s Dracula. From 1920 to 1948 Bran served as royal residence, a gift of the people of Brasov to Queen Marie of Romania. The castle is now a museum open to tourists, displaying art and furniture collected by Queen Marie.

Bran Castle also known as Dracula’ Castle is situated on the Transylvanian side of the historical border with Wallachia. ‘Dracula’s Castle’ was actually founded by the Teutonic Knights in 1212, and rebuilt by the Saxons of Kronstadt in 1377. Surrounded by an aura of mystery and legend and perched high atop a 200-foot-high rock, Bran Castle owes its fame to its imposing towers and turrets as well as to the myth created around Bram Stocker’s Dracula. From 1920 to 1948 Bran served as royal residence, a gift of the people of Brasov to Queen Marie of Romania. The castle is now a museum open to tourists, displaying art and furniture collected by Queen Marie.

Peles Castle

In the picturesque town of Sinaia, Peles Castle is a masterpiece of German new-Renaissance architecture. Commissioned by King Carol I in 1873, the castle served as the summer residence of the royal family until 1947. King Carol’s successor, King Ferdinand built a smaller version, but equally grand. Several auxiliary buildings were built simultaneously with the castle: the guards’ chambers, the Economat Building, the Foișor hunting lodge, the royal stables, and a power plant. Peleș became the world’s first castle fully powered by locally produced electricity. Here you can admire how the furniture, art and decor change from one room to another in one of the most beautiful houses in Europe.

In the picturesque town of Sinaia, Peles Castle is a masterpiece of German new-Renaissance architecture. Commissioned by King Carol I in 1873, the castle served as the summer residence of the royal family until 1947. King Carol’s successor, King Ferdinand built a smaller version, but equally grand. Several auxiliary buildings were built simultaneously with the castle: the guards’ chambers, the Economat Building, the Foișor hunting lodge, the royal stables, and a power plant. Peleș became the world’s first castle fully powered by locally produced electricity. Here you can admire how the furniture, art and decor change from one room to another in one of the most beautiful houses in Europe.

Snagov monastery

Hidden by woods and surrounded by the waters of the Lake Snagov, the Snagov Monastery was the most important spiritual and cultural centre of Wallachia in the feudal period. Built on an ancient place – where the archaeological finds have discovered clay pots of the Bronze Age and Iron Age, as well Roman and Byzantine coins – the monastery is one of the oldest monastic settlements. Some legends say that after the ruler Vlad Tepes was murdered in 1476 by the Wallachian boyars, the monks of the monastery would have taken the body and bury it in secret in the church.

Hidden by woods and surrounded by the waters of the Lake Snagov, the Snagov Monastery was the most important spiritual and cultural centre of Wallachia in the feudal period. Built on an ancient place – where the archaeological finds have discovered clay pots of the Bronze Age and Iron Age, as well Roman and Byzantine coins – the monastery is one of the oldest monastic settlements. Some legends say that after the ruler Vlad Tepes was murdered in 1476 by the Wallachian boyars, the monks of the monastery would have taken the body and bury it in secret in the church.

Comana Monastery

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

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