Plovdiv to Sibiu

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Sightseeings on trip​

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English speaking driver

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Hotel pick up / drop off

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Pet not allowed

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Up to 7 passengers

Your journey can be made with 4 types of cars: sedan for 1 – 3 people ( ex. Volkswagen Passat or Skoda Octavia),  executive (VIP) for 1-3 people (ex. Mercedes E Class or Audi A6), MPV for 1-4 people ( ex. Ford Galaxy or Volkswagen Touran) and VAN for  1-7 people ( ex. Renault Trafic or Volkswagen Transporter). If your group is bigger the 7 people we will use a combination of vehicles.  Also for every trip are available a few stops at interesting sightseeings for a price between 16 – 18 Euro/h.

Optional sights for visiting on this trip

Veliko Tarnovo

Veliko Tarnovo, often referred to as the ‘City of the Tsars’, is famous as the historical capital of the 12th century Second Bulgarian Empire and the remains of old times are still very visible. Located on three hills, with two medieval fortresses rising above the city and Ottoman 19th century buildings backing onto some less picturesque grey, socialist blocks Veliko Tarnovo offers a condensed lesson on Bulgarian history. A walk through the Old Town fully immerses visitors in the town’s rich history.

Veliko Tarnovo, often referred to as the ‘City of the Tsars’, is famous as the historical capital of the 12th century Second Bulgarian Empire and the remains of old times are still very visible. Located on three hills, with two medieval fortresses rising above the city and Ottoman 19th century buildings backing onto some less picturesque grey, socialist blocks Veliko Tarnovo offers a condensed lesson on Bulgarian history. A walk through the Old Town fully immerses visitors in the town’s rich history.

Rock-hewn churches of Ivanovo

The caves in the region had been inhabited by monks from the 1220s, when it was founded by the future Patriarch of Bulgaria Joachim I, to the 17th century, where they hewed cells, churches and chapels out of solid rock. At the peak of the monastery complex, the number of churches was about 40, while the other premises were around 300. While most are not preserved today, the surviving churches are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for the artistry of their medieval murals.

The caves in the region had been inhabited by monks from the 1220s, when it was founded by the future Patriarch of Bulgaria Joachim I, to the 17th century, where they hewed cells, churches and chapels out of solid rock. At the peak of the monastery complex, the number of churches was about 40, while the other premises were around 300. While most are not preserved today, the surviving churches are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for the artistry of their medieval murals.

Basarbovo monastery

Basarbovo Monastery– the Monastery of Saint Dimitar Basarbowski – is a Bulgarian-orthodox cave monastery near the city of Ruse in north-eastern Bulgaria. It has the same name as the nearby village of Basarbovo and lies about 35 metres above the river Rusenski Lom, south of the Danube. The monastery became famous in the 17th century after the death of St. Dimitar Basarbovski, whom St Paìsiy Hilendàrski talks about in the book “Istoriya Slavyanobolgarskaya “. St. Dimitar Basarbovski was a shepherd and led an ascetic life in the rocks of the monastery.

Basarbovo Monastery– the Monastery of Saint Dimitar Basarbowski – is a Bulgarian-orthodox cave monastery near the city of Ruse in north-eastern Bulgaria. It has the same name as the nearby village of Basarbovo and lies about 35 metres above the river Rusenski Lom, south of the Danube. The monastery became famous in the 17th century after the death of St. Dimitar Basarbovski, whom St Paìsiy Hilendàrski talks about in the book “Istoriya Slavyanobolgarskaya “. St. Dimitar Basarbovski was a shepherd and led an ascetic life in the rocks of the monastery.

Comana Monastery

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

Curtea de Arges Monastery

The Cathedral of Curtea de Argeș (early 16th century) is a Romanian Orthodox cathedral in Curtea de Arges, Romania. It is located on the grounds of the Curtea de Argeș Monastery, and is dedicated to Dormition of the Mother of God. The building resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, and was built in the Byzantine architectural style, with Moorish arabesques. “The legend of master Manole”, which is directly connected to the name of Curtea de Arges Monastery, says that the ruler hired the greatest masters to build the place of worship. But all that they had built during the day fell apart during the night. So one night Manole had a dream, showing him that the construction would resist only if he built his wife in one of the walls. The next day, when his wife Ana came to bring him the food, Manole built her in the South wall.

The Cathedral of Curtea de Argeș (early 16th century) is a Romanian Orthodox cathedral in Curtea de Arges, Romania. It is located on the grounds of the Curtea de Argeș Monastery, and is dedicated to Dormition of the Mother of God. The building resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, and was built in the Byzantine architectural style, with Moorish arabesques. “The legend of master Manole”, which is directly connected to the name of Curtea de Arges Monastery, says that the ruler hired the greatest masters to build the place of worship. But all that they had built during the day fell apart during the night. So one night Manole had a dream, showing him that the construction would resist only if he built his wife in one of the walls. The next day, when his wife Ana came to bring him the food, Manole built her in the South wall.

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