Sibiu to Ruse

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Sightseeings on trip​

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English speaking driver

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Hotel pick up / drop off

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Pet not allowed

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Up to 7 passengers

Your journey can be made with 4 types of cars: sedan for 1 – 3 people ( ex. Volkswagen Passat or Skoda Octavia),  executive (VIP) for 1-3 people (ex. Mercedes E Class or Audi A6), MPV for 1-4 people ( ex. Ford Galaxy or Volkswagen Touran) and VAN for  1-7 people ( ex. Renault Trafic or Volkswagen Transporter). If your group is bigger the 7 people we will use a combination of vehicles.  Also for every trip are available a few stops at interesting sightseeings for a price between 16 – 18 Euro/h.

Optional sights for visiting on this trip

Cisnadie Fortified Church

Originally built in the 12th century, the church was fortified during the 15th century to protect the local Saxon population against repeated Ottoman raids. The fortification process included the construction of fortified towers over the two side entrances and the choir, the building of a double structure of defense walls, a moat and several defensive towers along the walls. The clock installed in the 195-feet high (bell and clock) tower has been working since 1868; no repairs were ever needed!

Originally built in the 12th century, the church was fortified during the 15th century to protect the local Saxon population against repeated Ottoman raids. The fortification process included the construction of fortified towers over the two side entrances and the choir, the building of a double structure of defense walls, a moat and several defensive towers along the walls. The clock installed in the 195-feet high (bell and clock) tower has been working since 1868; no repairs were ever needed!

Fagaras Citadel

Fagaras Citadel is an impressively intact fortification from medieval Transylvania. Built over a 12th-century wooden fortress razed to the ground by Tatars, the citadel began to take shape in 1310. During the 15th through 17th centuries, the castle was enlarged and improved, making it one of the strongest fortifications in Transylvania. The Citadel has 85 rooms, one of them being the torture chamber, still preserving the most infamous torture instrument in Europe. During the restoration works, a tunnel was discovered, along with a disturbing historical fact: in the old days, the criminals and traitors sentenced to death were buried inside the fortress walls. Since 1954, the castle has housed the Museum of Fagaras County.

Fagaras Citadel is an impressively intact fortification from medieval Transylvania. Built over a 12th-century wooden fortress razed to the ground by Tatars, the citadel began to take shape in 1310. During the 15th through 17th centuries, the castle was enlarged and improved, making it one of the strongest fortifications in Transylvania. The Citadel has 85 rooms, one of them being the torture chamber, still preserving the most infamous torture instrument in Europe. During the restoration works, a tunnel was discovered, along with a disturbing historical fact: in the old days, the criminals and traitors sentenced to death were buried inside the fortress walls. Since 1954, the castle has housed the Museum of Fagaras County.

Cozia Monastery

Known as the oldest and most complex historical and art monuments from Romania, Cozia Monastery is situated on the right bank of the river Olt. It was built between 1386-1388, being one of the most important foundations of the grandfather of Vlad the Impaler, ruler Mircea the Ancient. Along with the main medieval church with its tower, the monastery also has two chapels from the 16th and 18th centuries.

Known as the oldest and most complex historical and art monuments from Romania, Cozia Monastery is situated on the right bank of the river Olt. It was built between 1386-1388, being one of the most important foundations of the grandfather of Vlad the Impaler, ruler Mircea the Ancient. Along with the main medieval church with its tower, the monastery also has two chapels from the 16th and 18th centuries.

Curtea de Arges Monastery

The Cathedral of Curtea de Argeș (early 16th century) is a Romanian Orthodox cathedral in Curtea de Arges, Romania. It is located on the grounds of the Curtea de Argeș Monastery, and is dedicated to Dormition of the Mother of God. The building resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, and was built in the Byzantine architectural style, with Moorish arabesques. “The legend of master Manole”, which is directly connected to the name of Curtea de Arges Monastery, says that the ruler hired the greatest masters to build the place of worship. But all that they had built during the day fell apart during the night. So one night Manole had a dream, showing him that the construction would resist only if he built his wife in one of the walls. The next day, when his wife Ana came to bring him the food, Manole built her in the South wall.

The Cathedral of Curtea de Argeș (early 16th century) is a Romanian Orthodox cathedral in Curtea de Arges, Romania. It is located on the grounds of the Curtea de Argeș Monastery, and is dedicated to Dormition of the Mother of God. The building resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, and was built in the Byzantine architectural style, with Moorish arabesques. “The legend of master Manole”, which is directly connected to the name of Curtea de Arges Monastery, says that the ruler hired the greatest masters to build the place of worship. But all that they had built during the day fell apart during the night. So one night Manole had a dream, showing him that the construction would resist only if he built his wife in one of the walls. The next day, when his wife Ana came to bring him the food, Manole built her in the South wall.

Comana Monastery

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

In 1461, the original Comana Monastery was founded and built by Vlad Țepeș (Vlad the Impaler) as a monastery-fortress. The place where the monastery was built was once an island in the middle of the swamps and the access was done through a door located in the north of the precinct, after crossing a wooden bridge easy to fire in case of danger. During archeological work performed in the 1970s, a headless body, which may be that of Vlad Tepes, known as Vlad the Impaler, was discovered on the grounds of the current monastery. Historian Constantin Rezachevici and others believe that he may have been buried here, near the battlefield where he was killed.

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